FAQs

What is a home inspection?

A home inspection is when a licensed home inspector reviews the house to locate structural, electrical or mechanical problems. A home inspection is designed to protect buyers by revealing any problems with the home they otherwise would not have known about.

Why is a home inspection necessary?

They aren't required by law but are in place for your protection. It will give you peace of mind that comes from knowing the true condition of the home you are purchasing.

When does the home inspection take place?

Usually, the home inspection will take place shortly after the seller accepted the buyer's offer. It will happen before the appraisal. Be sure to schedule your home inspection as soon as you can so you can have enough time to make repair requests. If something is revealed that is going to be a deal breaker, you will want to know sooner rather than later. As the home buyer, it is you responsibility to book your home inspection appointment.

What is involved in the home inspection process?

The inspector will examine the home inside and out. Once the inspection is completed, we will review any discrepancies about what we have found. I will provide you a copy of the report as well. That is when you, the home buyer, has to decide what you're comfortable accepting and what you're going to ask the seller to fix.

What will you be looking for?

When inspecting a home I look at problems with the home's heating/cooling system, structure, roof, plumbing, electrical system, windows/doors, foundation and much more.

How long does a home inspection take?

It all depends on the size of the home that I am inspecting. It can usually take anywhere from 2-4 hours.

Is the home inspection part of my closing costs?

No. You are responsible for paying for the inspection when it is performed. It is not part of your closing costs and the same will go for any repair costs.

Do you need a home inspection to get a loan?

In majority of cases you do not need an inspection to get a mortgage loan. The lender will require that the home is appraised, but not inspected. It is still wise as a home buyer to have your new home inspected.